When Game Narratives Run Deeper Than Ever Imagined 

Content Warning: sexual abuse Gone Home is incredibly beautiful, subtle, and powerful in its narrative. So many little pieces are available for discovery and connection in the game that don’t relate directly to the object of the game. Players can learn about the characters pasts, read private notes and letters, read work and school documents, and…

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Is Less More? The Effects of What’s Missing in Gone Home

I established in my last post that Gone Home is a lonely game. This has not changed at all as I’ve continued playing. The game is shockingly devoid of characters and character interaction. We never even see so much as a reflection of the player character Kaitlin. She speak to and encounters no ones throughout the game. The…

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Stillness and Loneliness: The Mechanics of Gone Home

In the first 30 minutes of playing Gone Home, nothing happens. For the next 30 minutes, still nothing happens. Other that the rain hitting the roof and the occasional loud clap of thunder and flash of lightning, nothing in the game world truly happens thats outside of player control. Kaitlin, the player character, has arrived to…

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